From Coma to Mrs. Ohio

Do you remember where you were on January 3, 1999? Unfortunately I remember that Sunday too well. That day I was diagnosed with Type I Diabetes. We were told I would have to have something called insulin every day to stay alive. Let me start at the beginning-

April 1998: I began losing weight and was sick all the time. Through summer I continued to lose weight. December 19, 1998, my 10th birthday, we went to the movies with my friends and while the other kids were watching the movie, I was in the bathroom vomiting. My friends were picked up because I was sick with a “virus”.

January 1, 1999: My sister and I were both vomiting so we went to the doctor. He said it was a virus. My sister got better. I went to sleep.

January 3 my family took to the hospital carrying me, limp. A nurse came to my mom’s aid and immediately said “Can’t you smell her? She’s diabetic!” I was immediately admitted to the hospital. I was so dehydrated they stuck me over 10 times and could not get an IV started. Finally, the doctor came and started the IV in my neck. My mom and dad stayed in my room that night with a crash cart sitting beside my bed. The doctor stayed with them most of that night. I was transported to Children’s Hospital the next morning when I was stable enough to move.

Once I woke up from my coma, our education about Type I Diabetes began. We were given books and classes while I was in the hospital about this disease and what was going on with my body. I visited teams of doctors, nurses, therapists, dietitians, and diabetes educators to learn about food and how to count carbs, to grasp the importance of taking care of myself, and to boost our spirits. Not only was the care phenomenal, I remember the personnel being patient, understanding and personable with me and my family during our major time of need.

The care was so superb, my family and I decided to travel to Columbus (a 2.5 hour drive every three months) until I turned 18 to work with this incredible team and hospital. I devote a lot of my success, independence and responsibility traits to Children’s hospital because they taught me the important values of life.

A doctor at Children’s said once I’m a girl with diabetes, but don’t ever let that get in my way of doing anything I want to do – and I haven’t. I’ve graduated college, I’m successful in the advertising and marketing field, and I’m married to a wonderful husband. And this year I’m Mrs. Ohio International. I use my title to advocate and educate people about Diabetes and volunteer for those who have helped me along the way.

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  • Name: Heather P.Heather Peaytt
  • Condition(s): Diabetes, Type I
  • Age at Treatment: 10 years old
  • Age Today: 12/19/198833 Years

Do you remember where you were on January 3, 1999? Unfortunately I remember that Sunday too well. That day I was diagnosed with Type I Diabetes. We were told I would have to have something called insulin every day to stay alive. Let me start at the beginning-

April 1998: I began losing weight and was sick all the time. Through summer I continued to lose weight. December 19, 1998, my 10th birthday, we went to the movies with my friends and while the other kids were watching the movie, I was in the bathroom vomiting. My friends were picked up because I was sick with a “virus”.

January 1, 1999: My sister and I were both vomiting so we went to the doctor. He said it was a virus. My sister got better. I went to sleep.

January 3 my family took to the hospital carrying me, limp. A nurse came to my mom’s aid and immediately said “Can’t you smell her? She’s diabetic!” I was immediately admitted to the hospital. I was so dehydrated they stuck me over 10 times and could not get an IV started. Finally, the doctor came and started the IV in my neck. My mom and dad stayed in my room that night with a crash cart sitting beside my bed. The doctor stayed with them most of that night. I was transported to Children’s Hospital the next morning when I was stable enough to move.

Once I woke up from my coma, our education about Type I Diabetes began. We were given books and classes while I was in the hospital about this disease and what was going on with my body. I visited teams of doctors, nurses, therapists, dietitians, and diabetes educators to learn about food and how to count carbs, to grasp the importance of taking care of myself, and to boost our spirits. Not only was the care phenomenal, I remember the personnel being patient, understanding and personable with me and my family during our major time of need.

The care was so superb, my family and I decided to travel to Columbus (a 2.5 hour drive every three months) until I turned 18 to work with this incredible team and hospital. I devote a lot of my success, independence and responsibility traits to Children’s hospital because they taught me the important values of life.

A doctor at Children’s said once I’m a girl with diabetes, but don’t ever let that get in my way of doing anything I want to do – and I haven’t. I’ve graduated college, I’m successful in the advertising and marketing field, and I’m married to a wonderful husband. And this year I’m Mrs. Ohio International. I use my title to advocate and educate people about Diabetes and volunteer for those who have helped me along the way.

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