Jacob’s Story

When Jacob was very young something seemed wrong. He didn’t seem to be developing well. His local pediatrician recommended that he go to the Neurology Clinic at Nationwide Children’s Hospital. It was there that the family met Dr. Emily De Los Reyes and learned that Jacob has cerebral palsy. It was just before his first birthday.

Cerebral Palsy (CP) is a condition that causes movement difficulties. The extent of the difficulty can range from mild to severe. There is no cure; however, there are many treatments and resources that can greatly assist a child with CP and ensure they reach their fullest potential.

Jacob is determined to reach his fullest potential. He receives occupationalphysical and speech therapies at Nationwide Children’s Hospital, making the two-hour round trip weekly. Jacob also participated in the Physical Therapy Strive and the Occupational Therapy Constraint Programs, where he had therapy daily for a month. And he continues to see Dr. Emily for Botox injections, which reduce the tightness in his muscles and stretch and strengthen them for walking.

“One of the things that keeps me positive is the support and knowledge of the team of professionals at Nationwide Children’s Hospital. From a two-year-old who spoke a few scattered words, Jacob now sometimes won’t stop talking. He began walking with a reverse walker with a sling to help him stand and is now close to getting rid of one of his forearm crutches. He started trying to thread yarn through a bead and now works on writing his name. I don’t think any of us knew what amazing progress Jacob would make over the past five years,” says Jacob’s mom, Sue.

When not working on reaching his fullest potential, Jacob enjoys playing with his brother and cousin, swimming, camping and riding his bike.

https://flutter.nationwidechildrens.org/wp-content/uploads/2015/10/Jacob.jpg
  • Name: Jacob A.Jacob Addington
  • Condition(s): Infantile Cerebral Palsy
  • Age at Treatment: 5 years
  • Age Today: 12/07/200911 Years

When Jacob was very young something seemed wrong. He didn’t seem to be developing well. His local pediatrician recommended that he go to the Neurology Clinic at Nationwide Children’s Hospital. It was there that the family met Dr. Emily De Los Reyes and learned that Jacob has cerebral palsy. It was just before his first birthday.

Cerebral Palsy (CP) is a condition that causes movement difficulties. The extent of the difficulty can range from mild to severe. There is no cure; however, there are many treatments and resources that can greatly assist a child with CP and ensure they reach their fullest potential.

Jacob is determined to reach his fullest potential. He receives occupationalphysical and speech therapies at Nationwide Children’s Hospital, making the two-hour round trip weekly. Jacob also participated in the Physical Therapy Strive and the Occupational Therapy Constraint Programs, where he had therapy daily for a month. And he continues to see Dr. Emily for Botox injections, which reduce the tightness in his muscles and stretch and strengthen them for walking.

“One of the things that keeps me positive is the support and knowledge of the team of professionals at Nationwide Children’s Hospital. From a two-year-old who spoke a few scattered words, Jacob now sometimes won’t stop talking. He began walking with a reverse walker with a sling to help him stand and is now close to getting rid of one of his forearm crutches. He started trying to thread yarn through a bead and now works on writing his name. I don’t think any of us knew what amazing progress Jacob would make over the past five years,” says Jacob’s mom, Sue.

When not working on reaching his fullest potential, Jacob enjoys playing with his brother and cousin, swimming, camping and riding his bike.

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