Mya’s Story

On Saturday, October 1, 2016, Mya was cheering on her Gahanna Lincoln High School Football team with the rest of her cheer squad when she suddenly collapsed on the field.

She was rushed to Nationwide Children’s Hospital Emergency Department (ED) immediately, where things quickly went from bad to worse within minutes. Mya’s heart rate escalated very high and her blood pressure dropped extremely low. While the staff was trying to figure out what was wrong, she coded and was without a heartbeat for over 8 minutes. After many chest compressions, fluids, and blood transfusions, the ED team was able to bring her back.

The Trauma Program at Nationwide Children’s Hospital is one of the largest pediatric American College of Surgeons (ACS) verified Level 1 trauma centers in the nation.

For 13 days, she was in the PICU unconscious on a ventilator, as she battled respiratory failure and pulmonary hemorrhage for several days, which is a severe bleeding from the lungs. Mya stayed in the hospital for 17 days, where 7 different teams of doctors worked tirelessly to determine what was the cause of Septic Shock, which still remains a mystery.

Sacheen, Mya’s mother, recalls one of her most poignant memories during this hospital stay. An attending ICU doctor found her in her grief when things had taken a turn for the worse.

“He sat me down in a chair, got down on his knees and held my hands. He looked me right in my eyes and said, ‘We are doing everything we can to keep her here. I cannot guarantee everything will be okay, but you must believe it will,’” says Sacheen. “The incredible staff saved our daughter’s life. Even though the initial scene in the ER was chaotic, all the staff members were kind, caring and sympathetic to Mya and our family.”

Most recently, in March 2017, Mya was diagnosed as having Supraventricular Tachycardia, or SVT. After a cardiac episode at home, Mya was again rushed to the Nationwide Children’s, where she had a heart ablation surgery to help restore a normal rhythm for her heart. She continues to receive follow-up treatment today.

Mya is a competitive gymnast and plans to compete again this season. She also hopes to return to cheering for her high school in the future. In addition to her athletic abilities, she has an artistic, creative side. Last year, Mya watched her dad, Oyauma, run the full Nationwide Children’s Hospital Columbus Marathon from her hospital room as she recovered.

https://flutter.nationwidechildrens.org/wp-content/uploads/gravity_forms/4-ede9f44fbfc12d4ad796078917b471d6/2017/07/Mya.JPG

On Saturday, October 1, 2016, Mya was cheering on her Gahanna Lincoln High School Football team with the rest of her cheer squad when she suddenly collapsed on the field.

She was rushed to Nationwide Children’s Hospital Emergency Department (ED) immediately, where things quickly went from bad to worse within minutes. Mya’s heart rate escalated very high and her blood pressure dropped extremely low. While the staff was trying to figure out what was wrong, she coded and was without a heartbeat for over 8 minutes. After many chest compressions, fluids, and blood transfusions, the ED team was able to bring her back.

The Trauma Program at Nationwide Children’s Hospital is one of the largest pediatric American College of Surgeons (ACS) verified Level 1 trauma centers in the nation.

For 13 days, she was in the PICU unconscious on a ventilator, as she battled respiratory failure and pulmonary hemorrhage for several days, which is a severe bleeding from the lungs. Mya stayed in the hospital for 17 days, where 7 different teams of doctors worked tirelessly to determine what was the cause of Septic Shock, which still remains a mystery.

Sacheen, Mya’s mother, recalls one of her most poignant memories during this hospital stay. An attending ICU doctor found her in her grief when things had taken a turn for the worse.

“He sat me down in a chair, got down on his knees and held my hands. He looked me right in my eyes and said, ‘We are doing everything we can to keep her here. I cannot guarantee everything will be okay, but you must believe it will,’” says Sacheen. “The incredible staff saved our daughter’s life. Even though the initial scene in the ER was chaotic, all the staff members were kind, caring and sympathetic to Mya and our family.”

Most recently, in March 2017, Mya was diagnosed as having Supraventricular Tachycardia, or SVT. After a cardiac episode at home, Mya was again rushed to the Nationwide Children’s, where she had a heart ablation surgery to help restore a normal rhythm for her heart. She continues to receive follow-up treatment today.

Mya is a competitive gymnast and plans to compete again this season. She also hopes to return to cheering for her high school in the future. In addition to her athletic abilities, she has an artistic, creative side. Last year, Mya watched her dad, Oyauma, run the full Nationwide Children’s Hospital Columbus Marathon from her hospital room as she recovered.

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