Anna’s Story

Have you ever pinched your finger or had a paper cut, then been limited because of it – even just for a brief second? Imagine being born without fully formed hands or having paralysis of the muscles of your face. Imagine trying to speak, when it’s hard to even eat.

This is what Anna faces every day, with Moebius Syndrome. But she doesn’t let it get her down. Instead, she thrives.

Throughout her life, she has tried everything! Whether it’s bowling, dancing, horseback riding or volunteering at the local hospital – Anna rises above her challenges and tries new things. Anna has no fingers on her right hand and two nonfunctioning fingers on her left but still prefers using her natural limbs over the prosthetics that were fitted for her to help adapt better to her environment.

Anna also has ADHD, Anxiety and a GI Motility Disorder – but she just keeps on persevering with a zeal and passion for life and all her experiences.

Children or adolescents with chronic medical problems, including neurodevelopmental disabilities and diseases that affect multiple organ systems, are seen in the Complex Health Care Program at Nationwide Children’s Hospital, which helps patients achieve the best possible state of health and quality of life. These patients commonly face challenges that require coordinated solutions to maintain the greatest possible state of health with services that are holistic, coordinated, continuous and family-centered.

Anna is a people person. She has a sincere and genuine caring nature toward others. When you meet Anna, her sheer love for life will stand out to you – and you won’t ever forget her.

For the participants who pass through Anna’s mile at the Nationwide Children’s Columbus Marathon & ½ Marathon, they will find a new friend in her, and a renewed perspective on just how wonderful life can be.

https://flutter.nationwidechildrens.org/wp-content/uploads/2017/07/annamarie-marathon.jpg

Have you ever pinched your finger or had a paper cut, then been limited because of it – even just for a brief second? Imagine being born without fully formed hands or having paralysis of the muscles of your face. Imagine trying to speak, when it’s hard to even eat.

This is what Anna faces every day, with Moebius Syndrome. But she doesn’t let it get her down. Instead, she thrives.

Throughout her life, she has tried everything! Whether it’s bowling, dancing, horseback riding or volunteering at the local hospital – Anna rises above her challenges and tries new things. Anna has no fingers on her right hand and two nonfunctioning fingers on her left but still prefers using her natural limbs over the prosthetics that were fitted for her to help adapt better to her environment.

Anna also has ADHD, Anxiety and a GI Motility Disorder – but she just keeps on persevering with a zeal and passion for life and all her experiences.

Children or adolescents with chronic medical problems, including neurodevelopmental disabilities and diseases that affect multiple organ systems, are seen in the Complex Health Care Program at Nationwide Children’s Hospital, which helps patients achieve the best possible state of health and quality of life. These patients commonly face challenges that require coordinated solutions to maintain the greatest possible state of health with services that are holistic, coordinated, continuous and family-centered.

Anna is a people person. She has a sincere and genuine caring nature toward others. When you meet Anna, her sheer love for life will stand out to you – and you won’t ever forget her.

For the participants who pass through Anna’s mile at the Nationwide Children’s Columbus Marathon & ½ Marathon, they will find a new friend in her, and a renewed perspective on just how wonderful life can be.

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